National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

Event date 7 Feb '17 07:00 am - 06:00 pm
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National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD) was founded in 1999 as a national response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic within African American communities. This year’s theme is I Am My Brother’s and Sister’s Keeper, and it emphasizes our responsibility to stand united with our family and friends in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

In this 18th year, we ask you to add your support to the NBHAAD Thunderclap. Together, we can amplify prevention messages and help reduce HIV and AIDS for Blacks/African Americans.

By joining this effort, your voice will add momentum to our work and build on progress to date:

  • After steep increases, HIV diagnoses among African American gay and bisexual men, including those aged 13 to 24, have stabilized since 2010.
  • HIV diagnoses among African Americans who inject drugs were cut in half from 2008 through 2014, and African Americans who inject drugs (in 22 cities with a high number of HIV cases) report lower rates of syringe sharing than whites or Hispanics/Latinos.
  • From 2010 through 2014, new HIV diagnoses among African American women fell 24%.

As a national community mobilization initiative, National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day asks us to do four things:

  • Get Educated about HIV and AIDS;
  • Get Involved in community prevention efforts;
  • Get Tested to know your status; and
  • Get Treated to receive the continuum of care needed to live with HIV/AIDS.

Get Educated.

  • Review CDC fact sheets on the populations most affected by HIV, including African Americans.
  • Use the HIV Risk Reduction Tool, an interactive tool developed for adults that allows users to learn about the risk of getting or transmitting HIV and how to lower that risk.
  • Read the stigma fact sheet and stigma language guide to understand the effects of stigma and how to increase support for people living with HIV.

Get Involved.

Get Tested, and encourage others to get tested, too.

  • Check out CDC’s Doing It!, a national HIV testing and prevention campaign designed to motivate all adults to get tested for HIV and know their status.
  • Find the nearest testing center at https://gettested.cdc.gov or text your ZIP code to “KNOW IT” (566948). Home HIV tests are also available in many stores and pharmacies. Especially if you buy a test online, make sure the HIV test is FDA-approved.

Get Treated.

  • If you are living with HIV, check out HIV Treatment Works resources to get in care, stay in care, and live well.
  • Getting into care and on treatment will help you learn more about HIV and make decisions to take care of your health. HIV care and treatment will not only help you live longer, but it can help you live well.

You can also follow social media accounts that promote HIV prevention and testing and share and retweet messages all year long. Here are some from CDC and National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day:

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1 year agoAdd to Calender 2017-02-07 12:00:00 2017-02-07 12:00:00 National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD) was founded in 1999 as a national response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic within African American communities. This year’s theme is I Am My Brother’s and Sister’s Keeper, and it emphasizes our responsibility to stand united with our family and friends in the fight against HIV and AIDS. In this 18th year, we ask you to add your support to the NBHAAD Thunderclap. Together, we can amplify prevention messages and help reduce HIV and AIDS for Blacks/African Americans. By joining this effort, your voice will add momentum to our work and build on progress to date: After steep increases, HIV diagnoses among African American gay and bisexual men, including those aged 13 to 24, have stabilized since 2010. HIV diagnoses among African Americans who inject drugs were cut in half from 2008 through 2014, and African Americans who inject drugs (in 22 cities with a high number of HIV cases) report lower rates of syringe sharing than whites or Hispanics/Latinos. From 2010 through 2014, new HIV diagnoses among African American women fell 24%. As a national community mobilization initiative, National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day asks us to do four things: Get Educated about HIV and AIDS; Get Involved in community prevention efforts; Get Tested to know your status; and Get Treated to receive the continuum of care needed to live with HIV/AIDS. Get Educated. Review CDC fact sheets on the populations most affected by HIV, including African Americans. Use the HIV Risk Reduction Tool, an interactive tool developed for adults that allows users to learn about the risk of getting or transmitting HIV and how to lower that risk. Read the stigma fact sheet and stigma language guide to understand the effects of stigma and how to increase support for people living with HIV. Get Involved. Participate in a National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day event. Hold an event in your community. You can use event planning resources and then register your event on the National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day website. Access the NBHAAD Toolkit for additional ideas and resources. Get Tested, and encourage others to get tested, too. Check out CDC’s Doing It!, a national HIV testing and prevention campaign designed to motivate all adults to get tested for HIV and know their status. Find the nearest testing center at https://gettested.cdc.gov or text your ZIP code to “KNOW IT” (566948). Home HIV tests are also available in many stores and pharmacies. Especially if you buy a test online, make sure the HIV test is FDA-approved. Get Treated. If you are living with HIV, check out HIV Treatment Works resources to get in care, stay in care, and live well. Getting into care and on treatment will help you learn more about HIV and make decisions to take care of your health. HIV care and treatment will not only help you live longer, but it can help you live well. You can also follow social media accounts that promote HIV prevention and testing and share and retweet messages all year long. Here are some from CDC and National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day: Facebook: Act Against AIDS, Start Talking. Stop HIV., CDC HIV, and National Black AIDS Day. Twitter: @talkHIV, @CDC_HIVAIDS, and @NatBlackAIDSDay Instagram: Act Against AIDS Pinterest: Preventing HIV and STDs America/New_York public Health Care #NBHAAD #HIV #AIDS #blacklivesmatter